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Antique French Bronze Sculpture of the Greek Goddess "Tyche" circa 1865

A beautiful antique French bronze sculpture of the Greek goddess Tyche cast in France circa 1865. This figure is also known as the Roman goddess of good fortune called Minerva. Please notice the beautiful "contraposto" stance where the right leg is bent at the knee. This classical pose was designed to accentuate the curves of the body with the knee, hip and shoulder creating a sense of dynamic movement. The most famous example is the statue of David at the Accademia in Florence. This figure has a headdress that draws attention to the thick and lustrous hair of the goddess. She is holding the folds of her garment close to her body and the sculptor has taken advantage of the pose to drape the fabric in a series of cascading folds. The garment is fully modeled indicating this sculpture was designed to be viewed from all sides, not just the front. Because this is a nineteenth century representation of an ancient goddess pay particular attention to the laurel wreath she holds in her right hand. It supports a tablet in the shape of a modified shield that shows three plumes or quills. These additions to a classical figure are an excellent example of the manner in which the French sought to co-opt the values and traditions of ancient Greece and Rome to add legitimacy to their hold on power. Anybody with an education knew without an explanation what a particular figure represented. A sculpture of this scale and fine detail was often seen in the public rooms of an upper class household where its presence would confer a range of positive attributes upon the residents.

# BH184

DIMENSIONS

5.00" w x 4.75" d x 14.00" h

12.70cm w x 12.07cm d x 35.56cm h

$3,866.00

A beautiful bronze sculpture of the Roman goddess Tyche cast in France c. 1865. This figure is also known as the Roman goddess of good fortune called Minerva. Please notice the beautiful "contraposto" stance where the right leg is bent at the knee. This classical pose was designed to accentuate the curves of the body with the knee, hip and shoulder creating a sense of dynamic movement. The most famous example is the statue of David at the Accademia in Florence. This figure has a headdress that draws attention to the thick and lustrous hair of the goddess. She is holding the folds of her garment close to her body and the sculptor has taken advantage of the pose to drape the fabric in a series of cascading folds. The garment is fully modeled indicating this sculpture was designed to be viewed from all sides, not just the front. Because this is a nineteenth century representation of an ancient goddess pay particular attention to the laurel wreath she holds in her right hand. It supports a tablet in the shape of a modified shield that shows three plumes or quills. These additions to a classical figure are an excellent example of the manner in which the French sought to co-opt the values and traditions of ancient Greece and Rome to add legitimacy to their hold on power. Anybody with an education knew without an explanation what a particular figure represented. A sculpture of this scale and fine detail was often seen in the public rooms of an upper class household where its presence would confer a range of positive attributes upon the residents.