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Antique English Mahogany and Glass Folding Room Screen Paravent England circa 1860

A very large antique English mahogany and glass folding screen paravent from England circa 1860. This amazing artifact from nineteenth century England was originally used in a pub in the Lake District (made famous by the writings of Sir Robert Scott) where it shielded the interior from gusts of wintry wind when the door was opened to the outside. In France this same type of screen is used where it is known as a "paravent" literally translated as "against the wind". The frame was constructed of mahogany because of its durability and retains the original hinges that enable it to be folded and configured into a variety of shapes. The lower section of each of three sections are built exactly as a door would be with recessed panels set into the frame. The glass panels at the top allowed light to pass through the screen both to illuminate persons entering the pub but also to allow them to see inside while still bundled against the cold. These panels of glass are also original to the screen and have a wonderful waviness so prized in antique glass. The screen is quite substantial in both size and weight with a very distinctive presence. The simplicity of the screen is very attractive to modern taste and because it is finished on both sides it may easily be used where it may be seen from all directions.

# EA1

DIMENSIONS

84.00" w x 1.00" d x 78.00" h

213.36cm w x 2.54cm d x 198.12cm h

Sale Price $3,722.60 Regular Price $5,318.00

A very large antique English mahogany and glass folding screen circa 1860. This amazing artifact from nineteenth century England was originally used in a pub in the Lake District (made famous by the writings of Sir Robert Scott) where it shielded the interior from gusts of wintry wind when the door was opened to the outside. The frame was constructed of mahogany because of its durability and retains the original hinges that enable it to be folded and configured into a variety of shapes. The lower section of each of three sections are built exactly as a door would be with recessed panels set into the frame. The glass panels at the top allowed light to pass through the screen both to illuminate persons entering the pub but also to allow them to see inside while still bundled against the cold. These panels of glass are also original to the screen and have a wonderful waviness so prized in antique glass. The screen is quite substantial in both size and weight with a very distinctive presence. The simplicity of the screen is very attractive to modern taste and because it is finished on both sides it may easily be used where it may be seen from all directions.