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Antique English Painted Sheraton Mahogany Display Cabinet Bookcase England circa 1875

A George III style antique English painted mahogany bookcase circa 1875 with a broken pediment top. The elegant proportions of this bookcase give this cabinet a sense of grace and encouraged the refreshing use of a painted finish in the 1930's or 40's (following the lead of the famous English decorator Syrie Maugham) to give it a stylish presence. The top of the cabinet has a broken pediment crown notable for the correct balance of the two sides before the centre section is scooped out to frame the finial. Please note the use of dentil moulding on each slanted section of the pediment and the manner in which it directs the eye upward to focus on the finial in the centre. This type of pediment came into use during the reign of George II (1727-1760) as most furniture followed the path set by the architectural elements of the exterior and interiors of the grand homes where stately furniture was installed. Below the crown is a pair of tall and narrow cabinet doors each retaining their original antique glass panes notable for their wonderful ripple and wavy reflective quality. The glass is encased within a border of recessed moulding while the outside frames of the upper case section are distinguished with a series of vertical fluting adjacent to the cabinet doors. In order to take advantage of the large display space afforded by the openness of the glass the interior of the upper section has three fully adjustable shelves that allow the maximum of flexibility when choosing to display a collection. Each door opens fully without a centre divider to reveal the space with the right door having an interior lock opened with a key and the left door secured with a slide bolt at the top and bottom of the left door. The upper cabinet stands upon the lower cabinet that possesses a pair of cabinet doors but here they are closed cabinets that are able to conceal the contents within. Above the lower cabinet doors are a pair of shelves set side by side that each retain their original turned mahogany drawer pull in the original colour that contrasts beautifully with the painted finish. Each lower cabinet door also features a recessed panel as seen in the top doors as well as the same fluting flanking the drawers and doors. The slender incised lines of the fluting create a wonderful verticality to the overall appearance that adds immeasurably to its appeal. This cabinet also incorporates a Sheraton style base with a pair of splay legs that flank the shaped apron. This mixture of both George II and Sheraton  features is quite indicative of its age being in the last quarter of the nineteenth century. Choosing the best from the past was already active in furniture making the same way modern day manufacturers will choose to mix and match styles to make new pieces. When first created this cabinet was done in mahogany as it was meant to evoke the feel of the eighteenth century. Now it has been refreshed with a custom painted finish that is quite current with the modern desire for a monochromatic interior. By choosing a restrained palette the strict geometric lines of this cabinet are enhanced and emphasized in a way that a simple mahogany finish does not. Besides giving the cabinet an updated appearance the painted finish allows the cabinet to be placed within a casual ensemble where it will add a handsome architectural presence.

# MJ16

DIMENSIONS

42.50" w x 17.50" d x 101.00" h

107.95cm w x 44.45cm d x 256.54cm h

A George III style antique English painted mahogany bookcase circa 1875 with a broken pediment top. The elegant proportions of this bookcase give this cabinet a sense of grace and encouraged the refreshing use of a painted finish in the 1930's or 40's (following the lead of the famous English decorator Syrie Maugham) to give it a stylish presence. The top of the cabinet has a broken pediment crown notable for the correct balance of the two sides before the centre section is scooped out to frame the finial. Please note the use of dentil moulding on each slanted section of the pediment and the manner in which it directs the eye upward to focus on the finial in the centre. This type of pediment came into use during the reign of George II (1727-1760) as most furniture followed the path set by the architectural elements of the exterior and interiors of the grand homes where stately furniture was installed. Below the crown is a pair of tall and narrow cabinet doors each retaining their original antique glass panes notable for their wonderful ripple and wavy reflective quality. The glass is encased within a border of recessed moulding while the outside frames of the upper case section are distinguished with a series of vertical fluting adjacent to the cabinet doors. In order to take advantage of the large display space afforded by the openness of the glass the interior of the upper section has three fully adjustable shelves that allow the maximum of flexibility when choosing to display a collection. Each door opens fully without a centre divider to reveal the space with the right door having an interior lock opened with a key and the left door secured with a slide bolt at the top and bottom of the left door. The upper cabinet stands upon the lower cabinet that possesses a pair of cabinet doors but here they are closed cabinets that are able to conceal the contents within. Above the lower cabinet doors are a pair of shelves set side by side that each retain their original turned mahogany drawer pull in the original colour that contrasts beautifully with the painted finish. Each lower cabinet door also features a recessed panel as seen in the top doors as well as the same fluting flanking the drawers and doors. The slender incised lines of the fluting create a wonderful verticality to the overall appearance that adds immeasurably to its appeal. This cabinet also incorporates a Sheraton style base with a pair of splay legs that flank the shaped apron. This mixture of both George II and Sheraton  features is quite indicative of its age being in the last quarter of the nineteenth century. Choosing the best from the past was already active in furniture making the same way modern day manufacturers will choose to mix and match styles to make new pieces. When first created this cabinet was done in mahogany as it was meant to evoke the feel of the eighteenth century. Now it has been refreshed with a custom painted finish that is quite current with the modern desire for a monochromatic interior. By choosing a restrained palette the strict geometric lines of this cabinet are enhanced and emphasized in a way that a simple mahogany finish does not. Besides giving the cabinet an updated appearance the painted finish allows the cabinet to be placed within a casual ensemble where it will add a handsome architectural presence.