Cloud Zoom small image
My Cart

(On Hold) Antique English Regency Period Gold Leaf Convex Mirror England circa 1825 (19 1/2"dia.)

An antique English Regency period gold leaf circular convex mirror frame England circa 1825 enclosing the original convex mirror glass. This type of round mirror became especially popular during the Regency period in England (1810-1830) especially for use in a dining room. The supreme advantage of a convex mirror glass is that it is able to reflect a much larger area of an interior than a flat mirror glass. When a hostess was seated at the head of a table she could, with a quick glance into the convex glass, be sure when all her guests were finished with a particular course of dinner and signal to the servants that it was time to clear the table before continuing with the next round of dining. Because of their expense they were limited to upper class households whose owners had the leisure and money available to entertain at home on a regular basis. The great depth on this frame is essential to its effect when hanging on a wall as this enables the interior of the frame to cut sharply to the centre. Within the interior of the frame there is a concave section that contains nineteen spheres sheathed in the same gold leaf as the frame. These spheres are placed symmetrically around the frame and their globular shape is a nice complement to the round profile. The manner in which the available light in a room bounced around the frame created a pleasing variety of shadows and reflection that is as potent today as it appeared when first crafted. The convex mirror glass is surrounded by an ebonized frame with a reeded profile known as a "slip" because of the way the glass slips within the frame. The contrast between the black colour of the slip and the richness of the gold leaf is quite handsome and the circular shape adds an intriguingly different shape when furnishing a room. These mirrors are remarkably versatile in their ability to be splendid whether the design is contemporary or traditional because of their graphic quality that always makes them a focal point.

# EEJ159

DIMENSIONS

19.50" w x 3.00" d x 19.50" h

49.53cm w x 7.62cm d x 49.53cm h

An English Regency period gold leaf circular frame circa 1825 enclosing the original convex mirror glass. This type of round mirror became especially popular during the Regency period in England (1810-1830) especially for use in a dining room. The supreme advantage of a convex mirror glass is that it is able to reflect a much larger area of an interior than a flat mirror glass. When a hostess was seated at the head of a table she could, with a quick glance into the convex glass, be sure when all her guests were finished with a particular course of dinner and signal to the servants that it was time to clear the table before continuing with the next round of dining. Because of their expense they were limited to upper class households whose owners had the leisure and money available to entertain at home on a regular basis. The great depth on this frame is essential to its effect when hanging on a wall as this enables the interior of the frame to cut sharply to the centre. Within the interior of the frame there is a concave section that contains nineteen spheres sheathed in the same gold leaf as the frame. These spheres are placed symmetrically around the frame and their globular shape is a nice complement to the round profile. The manner in which the available light in a room bounced around the frame created a pleasing variety of shadows and reflection that is as potent today as it appeared when first crafted. The convex mirror glass is surrounded by an ebonized frame with a reeded profile known as a "slip" because of the way the glass slips within the frame. The contrast between the black colour of the slip and the richness of the gold leaf is quite handsome and the circular shape adds an intriguingly different shape when furnishing a room. These mirrors are remarkably versatile in their ability to be splendid whether the design is contemporary or traditional because of their graphic quality that always makes them a focal point.