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CMA04

A handsome antique English Windsor painted splat back armchair from Lancashire, England circa 1875. Please note the excellent combination of the turnings that give this chair a decidedly sculptural presence. The chair possesses the characteristic vertical and horizontal bow that defines the top of the back and the width of the arms. This is achieved by painstakingly bending a single piece of timber by using steam and pressure. The centre back of the is focused on a decorative device known as a splat that is placed directly in the middle and features a scalloped profile with a corresponding design cut out of the timber where it is said to be "pierced". Contained within upper bow there are four tapered spindles with a cylindrical profile that flank the splat on each side. The arms on this chair are extremely comfortable because they are broad in width with a rounded front where the hand and wrist rest when seated. Please look at the overall shape of this chair as the turner chose to set the spindles that support the arms and the four legs that the chair stands upon at a slight angle. This was done not purely for decorative reasons but also because this evenly distributes the weight of a sitter. The four legs each have a bold profile because of the scale of the turning as well as the addition of a four stretchers that connect the four legs. By using two stretchers to connect each pair of front and back legs the artisan moved the additional two stretchers further toward the centre area under the seat so the legs of a sitter would not be hindered when tucked under the seat. This leaves the six turned spindles that support the arms and are connected to the seat. It is interesting to see the front spindles under the front of the arms have a larger profile than the two spindles that flank the pierced splat. Because there is an overall coherence to the design the relationship between the legs and spindles is quite pleasing to the eye. The seat is shaped from a solid piece of timber and is modeled after the saddle used on a horse with its slightly raised centre section. The warmth of the colour and patina give this chair a beautiful appearance and encourage its daily use.

# CMA04

DIMENSIONS

26.00" w x 22.50" d x 45.50" h

66.04cm w x 57.15cm d x 115.57cm h

$2,732.00

A handsome antique English painted Windsor splat back armchair from Lancashire, circa 1875. Please note the excellent combination of the turnings that give this chair a decidedly sculptural presence. The chair possesses the characteristic vertical and horizontal bow that defines the top of the back and the width of the arms. This is achieved by painstakingly bending a single piece of timber by using steam and pressure. The centre back of the is focused on a decorative device known as a splat that is placed directly in the middle and features a scalloped profile with a corresponding design cut out of the timber where it is said to be "pierced". Contained within upper bow there are four tapered spindles with a cylindrical profile that flank the splat on each side. The arms on this chair are extremely comfortable because they are broad in width with a rounded front where the hand and wrist rest when seated. Please look at the overall shape of this chair as the turner chose to set the spindles that support the arms and the four legs that the chair stands upon at a slight angle. This was done not purely for decorative reasons but also because this evenly distributes the weight of a sitter. The four legs each have a bold profile because of the scale of the turning as well as the addition of a four stretchers that connect the four legs. By using two stretchers to connect each pair of front and back legs the artisan moved the additional two stretchers further toward the centre area under the seat so the legs of a sitter would not be hindered when tucked under the seat. This leaves the six turned spindles that support the arms and are connected to the seat. It is interesting to see the front spindles under the front of the arms have a larger profile than the two spindles that flank the pierced splat. Because there is an overall coherence to the design the relationship between the legs and spindles is quite pleasing to the eye. The seat is shaped from a solid piece of timber and is modeled after the saddle used on a horse with its slightly raised centre section. The warmth of the colour and patina give this chair a beautiful appearance and encourage its daily use.