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Antique French Limed Oak and Elm Table with Drawers circa 1850

A classic antique French limed oak and elm table France circa 1850. The style of the turned legs and stretchers is what identifies this table as being related to furniture created during the reign of Louis XIII (1610-1643). The top of this table features timber that runs lengthwise with a board placed on the perpendicular at either end. This construction technique was developed to achieve two goals. By placing the wood used at right angles to each other it reduced the chance of warping and bowing while the straight edge at either end where a person was seated ensured the timber would not crack and split where arms and elbows came into contact with the edge. Each of the four legs were turned from a single piece of timber which gave strength to the entire piece. Please notice the use of pegs where each leg is attached to the horizontal pieces of timber that make up the apron. More pegs are seen at other points over the table. By using pegs-wood joined into wood-the craftsman ensured not only stability but a join that stayed tight no matter the change in temperature or humidity. The end of the table encloses a large drawer that is not only wide but deep for the storage of supplies that needed to be easily accessible on a daily basis. Please notice that there is also a smaller drawer on the side of the table that has the same simple profile to the front as the larger drawer. Each drawer may be opened (and removed if necessary) by pulling on the iron ring placed in the centre of each drawer front. The turned legs present a pleasing symmetrical spacing along the entire length and allows the table to be viewed from any angle with its handsome profile easily observed. This antique French farm table probably began life with a dark stained finish that was lightened with the application of a lime wash to give it its present appearance.

# BE14

DIMENSIONS

78.75" w x 33.00" d x 31.75" h

200.03cm w x 83.82cm d x 80.65cm h

The style of the turned legs and stretchers is what identifies this table as being related to furniture created during the reign of Louis XIII (1610-1643). The top of this table features timber that runs lengthwise with a board placed on the perpendicular at either end. This construction technique was developed to achieve two goals. By placing the wood used at right angles to each other it reduced the chance of warping and bowing while the straight edge at either end where a person was seated ensured the timber would not crack and split where arms and elbows came into contact with the edge. Each of the four legs were turned from a single piece of timber which gave strength to the entire piece. Please notice the use of pegs where each leg is attached to the horizontal pieces of timber that make up the apron. More pegs are seen at other points over the table. By using pegs-wood joined into wood-the craftsman ensured not only stability but a join that stayed tight no matter the change in temperature or humidity. The end of the table encloses a large drawer that is not only wide but deep for the storage of supplies that needed to be easily accessible on a daily basis. Please notice that there is also a smaller drawer on the side of the table that has the same simple profile to the front as the larger drawer. Each drawer may be opened (and removed if necessary) by pulling on the iron ring placed in the centre of each drawer front. The turned legs present a pleasing symmetrical spacing along the entire length and allows the table to be viewed from any angle with its handsome profile easily observed. This antique French farm table probably began life with a dark stained finish that was lightened with the application of a lime wash to give it its present appearance.