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Antique French Louis XV Period Carved Oak Enfilade France circa 1760

An exceptional antique French Louis XV period carved oak enfilade from France circa 1760 from the region of Picardy. This enfilade is featured on the cover of the defining book published in french on furniture from the region of Picardy and a copy of the book is included with the enfilade. Picardy is located in the north of France with its largest city being Amiens. This region has a distinctive cultural flavour and includes two of the most famous Gothic cathedrals located in Amiens and Beauvais. The timber used in the construction of this enfilade is oak which was a native wood of this region and highly prized for its strength, durability and ability to retain a sharp edge when carved. There are several factors that enable this piece to be dated toward the end of the reign of Louis XV (1723-1774) primarily the symmetrical placement of the three cabinet doors and two drawers, the pair of panels that separate the doors and the use of a horizontal frieze beneath the top that features a pattern of interlocking ribbons known as "guilloche". The apron between the two front cabriole shaped feet has a pleasing undulation and note that it two has a symmetrical pattern in the curved pattern. Each of the front corners have a rounded profile and consist of a single piece of oak timber with a recessed vertical panel defined by a moulded edge. This visual enhancement of the curve was necessary as the light in the room came only from firelight and candlelight. The change in profile across the entire facade of this cabinet was designed to take advantage of the available light and use it to greatest effect. Each of the three doors are rectangular in shape with a handsome series of mouldings that frame the elegant series of scrolls along the top. Notice that the left and right door have opposing scrollwork while the centre door has the same pattern as the right door. This was always a stylistic choice the designer made when carving the cabinet and appears as a true sign of pieces made during the reign of Louis XV. When looking at the pair of carved panels between the cabinet doors it is interesting to note that they are recessed where the cabinet doors are affixed with hinges that enable them to stand forward of the enfilade. Again it is a change in the profile that enhances the effect of flames that would be flickering in the room. Each panel is carved with a tall vase with handles with a handsome balanced bouquet sprouting up and out from the neck of the vase. Above each of these panels are drawers that have a circular medallion with a carved design and a circular ring pull to allow them each to be opened. Behind the three cabinet doors is a shelf to provide useful and secure storage as these doors may only be opened with a key. The sides each have a rectangular recessed panel and the top boards have a slight curve to them as they are almost two hundred and fifty years old. As wood is an organic material it shows the passage of time with a slight desire to torque but superior cabinet makers were aware of this tendency and utilized methods to counteract this movement. This is an extraordinary example of period French furniture with the added benefit of being a seminal piece from a particular region. Its original use as a cabinet for storage with a serving surface continues to be its primary function and the warmth of the colour and gleam of the antique patina is totally enchanting. This enfilade will be a wonderful piece to anchor the design of a variety of rooms.

# 002EAVM102

DIMENSIONS

94.00" w x 22.00" d x 38.00" h

238.76cm w x 55.88cm d x 96.52cm h

$21,872.00

An exceptional antique French Louis XV period carved oak enfilade circa 1760 from the region of Picardy. This enfilade is featured on the cover of the defining book published in french on furniture from the region of Picardy and a copy of the book is included with the enfilade. Picardy is located in the north of France with its largest city being Amiens. This region has a distinctive cultural flavour and includes two of the most famous Gothic cathedrals located in Amiens and Beauvais. The timber used in the construction of this enfilade is oak which was a native wood of this region and highly prized for its strength, durability and ability to retain a sharp edge when carved. There are several factors that enable this piece to be dated toward the end of the reign of Louis XV (1723-1774) primarily the symmetrical placement of the three cabinet doors and two drawers, the pair of panels that separate the doors and the use of a horizontal frieze beneath the top that features a pattern of interlocking ribbons known as "guilloche". The apron between the two front cabriole shaped feet has a pleasing undulation and note that it two has a symmetrical pattern in the curved pattern. Each of the front corners have a rounded profile and consist of a single piece of oak timber with a recessed vertical panel defined by a moulded edge. This visual enhancement of the curve was necessary as the light in the room came only from firelight and candlelight. The change in profile across the entire facade of this cabinet was designed to take advantage of the available light and use it to greatest effect. Each of the three doors are rectangular in shape with a handsome series of mouldings that frame the elegant series of scrolls along the top. Notice that the left and right door have opposing scrollwork while the centre door has the same pattern as the right door. This was always a stylistic choice the designer made when carving the cabinet and appears as a true sign of pieces made during the reign of Louis XV. When looking at the pair of carved panels between the cabinet doors it is interesting to note that they are recessed where the cabinet doors are affixed with hinges that enable them to stand forward of the enfilade. Again it is a change in the profile that enhances the effect of flames that would be flickering in the room. Each panel is carved with a tall vase with handles with a handsome balanced bouquet sprouting up and out from the neck of the vase. Above each of these panels are drawers that have a circular medallion with a carved design and a circular ring pull to allow them each to be opened. Behind the three cabinet doors is a shelf to provide useful and secure storage as these doors may only be opened with a key. The sides each have a rectangular recessed panel and the top boards have a slight curve to them as they are almost two hundred and fifty years old. As wood is an organic material it shows the passage of time with a slight desire to torque but superior cabinet makers were aware of this tendency and utilized methods to counteract this movement. This is an extraordinary example of period French furniture with the added benefit of being a seminal piece from a particular region. Its original use as a cabinet for storage with a serving surface continues to be its primary function and the warmth of the colour and gleam of the antique patina is totally enchanting. This enfilade will be a wonderful piece to anchor the design of a variety of rooms.