Cloud Zoom small image
My Cart

Antique Indian Inlaid Rosewood, Ebony and Brass Hoshiapur Table India circa 1890

An eight sided antique Indian inlaid rosewood, ebony and brass Hoshiapur folding table from India circa 1890. Turkish in inspiration, octagonal tables of this form were made in several parts of late 19th-century British India. They were produced principally in response to the growing fashion in Europe for Middle Eastern and Islamic furnishings and decorative accessories. This table was made in Hoshiapur circa 1890, a town in the Punjab known for its workmanship in the art of inlay. Tables of this form were used a central decorative feature for interiors conceived in an Islamic style. These were much in vogue in the 1880s and 1890s, particularly for men's smoking rooms. Typical features of these rooms included tented ceilings, tiles and turned lattice panels (mashrabiyya) mounted on the walls, richly cushioned banquettes, huqqas, low square or octagonal tables, Qu'ran stands and hanging lanterns. Often these tables are thought to be from Damascus where these Syrian inlaid pieces of furniture also appear. This particular rosewood table is quite large and features an arresting pattern of an eight point star inlaid using brass and ebony to provide compelling visual interest. The octagonal top stands upon a separate eight sided base that folds flat to aid in shipping and moving. All eight panels of the base are decorated in a floral theme that complements the pattern seen in the top using brass for its subtle reflective gleam. Because of its scale this table is suitable for many different areas of an interior where a touch of the exotic is desired.

# MA1

DIMENSIONS

24.00" w x 24.00" d x 24.50" h

60.96cm w x 60.96cm d x 62.23cm h

$3,632.00

Although Turkish in inspiration, octagonal tables of this form were made in several parts of late 19th-century British India. They were produced principally in response to the growing fashion in Europe for Middle Eastern and Islamic furnishings and decorative accessories. This table was made in Hoshiapur circa 1890, a town in the Punjab known for its workmanship in the art of inlay. Tables of this form were used a central decorative feature for interiors conceived in an Islamic style. These were much in vogue in the 1880s and 1890s, particularly for men's smoking rooms. Typical features of these rooms included tented ceilings, tiles and turned lattice panels (mashrabiyya) mounted on the walls, richly cushioned banquettes, huqqas, low square or octagonal tables, Qu'ran stands and hanging lanterns. Often these tables are thought to be from Damascus where these Syrian inlaid pieces of furniture also appear. This particular rosewood table is quite large and features an arresting pattern of an eight point star inlaid using brass and ebony to provide compelling visual interest. The octagonal top stands upon a separate eight sided base that folds flat to aid in shipping and moving. All eight panels of the base are decorated in a floral theme that complements the pattern seen in the top using brass for its subtle reflective gleam. Because of its scale this table is suitable for many different areas of an interior where a touch of the exotic is desired.