Cloud Zoom small image
My Cart

Vintage English Orkeney Islands Child's Chair Scotland circa 1920

A charming vintage English child's chair from the Orkney Islands of Scotland circa 1920. This is the traditional chair that has been made in the Orkney Islands since the 1700's but made to fit a child instead of an adult. Because of the strong and bitterly cold North Sea winds that blow continuously this type of chair was invented to keep the sitter safely enclosed within its woven straw back. Originally these chairs were constructed from driftwood as very little timber grows on the seventy islands that make up the Orkney archipelago. As the ease of transport for timber increased the traditional wood chosen is oak because of its inherent strength and durability. Locally grown straw was always used as it could be harvested and woven into tight strands that were shaped to create the distinctive enclosed back of an Orkney chair. Using straw for the back meant less timber was necessary in construction while the tightness of the woven straw braids made an impermeable barrier to the harsh drafts of bitterly cold air that would leak through the doorways and windows. This chair is superbly sturdy with all four legs connected by horizontal stretchers and the vertical supports that frame the back that connect to the seat and the stretchers. The smooth finish of the dark oak timber is a wonderful complement to the luminous colour of the straw and gives this chair a striking sculptural presence.

# EEJ301

DIMENSIONS

22.00" w x 20.00" d x 33.00" h

55.88cm w x 50.80cm d x 83.82cm h

$2,838.00

A charming child's chair from the Orkney Islands of Scotland c.1920. This is the traditional chair that has been made in the Orkney Islands since the 1700's but made to fit a child instead of an adult. Because of the strong and bitterly cold North Sea winds that blow continuously this type of chair was invented to keep the sitter safely enclosed within its woven straw back. Originally these chairs were constructed from driftwood as very little timber grows on the seventy islands that make up the Orkney archipelago. As the ease of transport for timber increased the traditional wood chosen is oak because of its inherent strength and durability. Locally grown straw was always used as it could be harvested and woven into tight strands that were shaped to create the distinctive enclosed back of an Orkney chair. Using straw for the back meant less timber was necessary in construction while the tightness of the woven straw braids made an impermeable barrier to the harsh drafts of bitterly cold air that would leak through the doorways and windows. This chair is superbly sturdy with all four legs connected by horizontal stretchers and the vertical supports that frame the back that connect to the seat and the stretchers. The smooth finish of the dark oak timber is a wonderful complement to the luminous colour of the straw and gives this chair a striking sculptural presence.