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Collection of Three Belgian Specimen Timber Vases, De Coene Frères, Belgium circa 1940

The striking modern quality of these three solid wood vases from Belgium circa 1940 and their superb craftsmanship lead to their attribution to the famed workshop of De Coene Frères in Kortrijk, Belgium. Please take the time to enlarge each photograph and see how each vase was created. Begun in the 1880's De Coene Frères quickly gained a reputation for their exceptional skill in design and execution of furnishings. Exhibiting at the Exposition des Arts Decoratifs in paris in 1925 the firm quickly moved into producing furnishings and objects in the new Art Deco manner. Each one of these vases was first assembled from a multitude of individual pieces of timber chosen for their colour and grain. First matched for balance and harmony the pieces were glued together in a block form then dried in a kiln to remove excess moisture. Then began the delicate work of turning the blocks. Each block was mounted upon a lathe where a skilled turner used a chisel to form the beautifully elongated shape topping out with the flared rim. Because the block was formed from a myriad of timber the turning revealed a particularly subtle pattern of size and shape across the rounded surface. These vases possess a wonderfully graphic effect when seen from a distance as well as offering a rewarding experience when they are admired close up. The smooth waxed and polished surface is particularly pleasing when the vases are picked up and handled.

# MG7

DIMENSIONS

12.50" w x 12.50" d x 37.50" h

31.75cm w x 31.75cm d x 95.25cm h

$6,968.00

The striking modern quality of these four solid wood vases and their superb craftsmanship lead to their attribution to the famed workshop of De Coene Frères in Kortrijk, Belgium. Please take the time to enlarge each photograph and see how each vase was created. Begun in the  1880's De Coene Frères quickly gained a reputation for their exceptional skill in design and execution of furnishings. Exhibiting at the Exposition des Arts Decoratifs in paris in 1925 the firm quickly moved into producing furnishings and objects in the new Art Deco manner. Each one of these vases was first assembled from a multitude of individual pieces of timber chosen for their colour and grain. First matched for balance and harmony the pieces were glued together in a block form then dried in a kiln to remove excess moisture. Then began the delicate work of turning the blocks. Each block was mounted upon a lathe where a skilled turner used a chisel to form the beautifully elongated shape topping out with the flared rim. Because the block was formed from a myriad of timber the turning revealed a particularly subtle pattern of size and shape across the rounded surface. These vases possess a wonderfully graphic effect when seen from a distance as well as offering a rewarding experience when they are admired close up. The smooth waxed and polished surface is particularly pleasing when the vases are picked up and handled.