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(On Hold) Antique Dutch Empire Period Mahogany Secrétaire, Holland circa 1820

This handsome Dutch mahogany secrétaire circa 1820 Holland showcases the choice of exotic timber to create a personal piece of furniture. Beautifully built during the Empire period around 1820 the clean and elegant lines are embellished with well carved paw feet at the front as well as a pair of bold scroll elements that flank the fall front. The reason this is a secrétaire is because the writing surface opens to form a single surface as opposed to the English and American examples which have slanted fronts. Please look closely to see the manner in which the artisan of this Empire secretaire matched the grain of the mahogany timber meticulously in order to give it the appearance of one continuous expanse. The ability to envision how a board of timber would look when cut into pieces and assembled has always been rare and the craftsmanship evident in this antique secretaire is exciting to behold. There are four drawers in this secretaire with one at the top above the fall front and three below the fall front. All open fully by pulling and pushing their original gilt bronze knobs. Interestingly the lower drawers each have an escutcheon in the center (a metal cover that protects the timber when  a key is guided through to the interior lock) while the top drawer is centered on a fanciful spray of gilt bronze. The top drawer locks when the fall front is locked while the lower three drawers may be locked and unlocked at will by using a key. When the fall front is opened and lays flat the interior is revealed with a multitude of sections for storage along with a full width shelf for the display of desirable objects. Note that there are nine small drawers as well as a cabinet door with a lock and key in the enclosed section behind the fall front and that the wide open expanse is divided into three sections by vertical dividers. When the secretaire is closed the scrolls that flank the fall front feature a gilded bronze mount above and below each scroll and these bronzes feature motifs seen on early nineteenth Dutch furniture. The reflective value of the gilt bronze and its importance to interior design cannot be overstated and these decorative mounts balance the actual working hardware seen on the drawers. In contrast to the straight lines of the chest are the front paw feet that refer to the eighteenth century style of cabinet making primarily in France and England. The reference to power is an essential element when paw feet are used and this secretaire is no exception. Fine design and the quality of the materials speaks to its ownership by a refined and cultured person who understood the value of these elements. Whether closed or open this secretaire is a special piece that will enhance any interior with its luxurious presence.

# 0043DLA138

DIMENSIONS

19.00" w x 43.50" d x 60.00" h

48.26cm w x 110.49cm d x 152.40cm h

This handsome Dutch mahogany secretaire showcases the choice of exotic timber to create a personal piece of furniture. Beautifully built during the Empire period around 1820 the clean and elegant lines are embellished with well carved paw feet at the front as well as a pair of bold scroll elements that flank the fall front. The reason why this is not a secretary is because the writing surface opens to form a single surface as opposed to the English and American examples which have slanted fronts. Please look closely to see the manner in which the artisan of this Empire secretaire matched the grain of the mahogany timber meticulously in order to give it the appearance of one continuous expanse. The ability to envision how a board of timber would look when cut into pieces and assembled has always been rare and the craftsmanship evident in this antique secretaire is exciting to behold. There are four drawers in this secretaire with one at the top above the fall front and three below the fall front. All open fully by pulling and pushing their original gilt bronze knobs. Interestingly the lower drawers each have an escutcheon in the center (a metal cover that protects the timber when  a key is guided through to the interior lock) while the top drawer is centered on a fanciful spray of gilt bronze. The top drawer locks when the fall front is locked while the lower three drawers may be locked and unlocked at will by using a key. When the fall front is opened and lays flat the interior is revealed with a multitude of sections for storage along with a full width shelf for the display of desirable objects. Note that there are nine small drawers as well as a cabinet door with a lock and key in the enclosed section behind the fall front and that the wide open expanse is divided into three sections by vertical dividers. When the secretaire is closed the scrolls that flank the fall front feature a gilded bronze mount above and below each scroll and these bronzes feature motifs seen on early nineteenth Dutch furniture. The reflective value of the gilt bronze and its importance to interior design cannot be overstated and these decorative mounts balance the actual working hardware seen on the drawers. In contrast to the straight lines of the chest are the front paw feet that refer to the eighteenth century style of cabinet making primarily in France and England. The reference to power is an essential element when paw feet are used and this secretaire is no exception. Fine design and the quality of the materials speaks to its ownership by a refined and cultured person who understood the value of these elements. Whether closed or open this secretaire is a special piece that will enhance any interior with its luxurious presence.