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Antique English William IV Period Mahogany Console Table with Drawer England circa 1835

An antique English William IV period mahogany console table with a concealed drawer from england circa 1835. The design of this superb mahogany console table features a bold profile and the original design indicates its prominent placement in an interior where it would be seen from all directions because it is finished with the same attention to detail on both sides as well as the front. The entire console is constructed of fully matched mahogany timber in order to present an appealingly complete surface across the top, sides and lower shelf as well as the sculptural presence necessitated by the fully turned columns in the front with their extraordinary capitals. A marvelously quirky aspect of this console table is the back edge of the top. Please use the zoom feature offered on our website to see the slight curve of the back edge. This unusual aspect of the console means it was a special commission for a particular location in an important city home. As more and more people achieved greater wealth they would often keep a house in the city for use during the social season as well as their home in the country. These city homes tended to be multi-story homes with grand staircases and several entries where a console table was used. The curve of the staircase wall was often curved and well made furniture would also incorporate a slight curve to accommodate this architectural feature. The curve of this edge is extremely slight and without pointing it out is actually not noticeable so it does not affect the placement of the console against a flat wall. The top of the console showcases a single piece of mahogany with the extravagant grain pattern that makes mahogany such a desirable timber. This pattern would have been quite potent in the candlelight and gaslight illumination of a nineteenth century interior and easily recognized as an important attribute. The apron beneath the top is another important component that distinguishes this table as being slightly later than the Regency period (1810-1830). The outward bowing edge is visible across the front as well as the sides to create a convex surface that adds a totally different aspect to the overall appearance of the console. This section is also notable as it contains a drawer that extends the full width of the table. But as there is no visible hardware on the drawer front it remains totally concealed to an observer. The drawer is easily opened by pulling forward on the underside of the drawer and pushing it back to close. Again, please enlarge the additional photograph to see the drawer in its open position. Furniture created during the Regency period possesses a distinctively architectural sensibility and this console table contains the same design impetus seen a decade earlier. The two front columns that support the table each have an elegant tapered profile with ring turnings at both the top and base and these turnings give a sense of finish and balance to the columns. But it is the lush symmetry and balance of the Ionic capitals to the columns that give this console its desirable luxurious quality. When seen directly from the front the side to side movement of the capital's carved details is embodied in the continuous line that terminates in a bold scroll on the left and right with deep ridges when seen from the sides. Beneath the capitals on the columns is a circular ring of flared lotus blossoms that resemble those seen on the columns at Karnak in Egypt. The combination of all of these subtle details to ancient worlds was directed at an educated class who would have understood these allusions with ease. The back legs are in the form of pilasters (flattened columns) that are also decorated with carved detail. Please notice how the flat expanses feature a recessed rectangular panel outlined with a bead of quarter round moulding with a rounded oval separated by a double ring pattern. The use of highly figured timber allied with richly carved details was chosen to take advantage of progress in lighting an interior since gas lighting was widely adopted by the 1820's in private residences. This increase in interior illumination enabled furniture designers and craftsmen to vastly increase the decorative embellishments available because they could now be seen and appreciated. The entire console stands upon a plinth base that gives it a very grounded appearance similar to that seen on the base of sculptures. The plinth base became widely used beginning in the regency period through the William IV period. Plinth bases were also used during the Empire period in france and the Biedermeier period in Austria and Germany. The estimable scale of this console enables it to be placed in a wide variety of spaces within a home where its shallow depth and lovely height allow it to display objects and complete a space with style because of its light and modern feeling.

# EEJ169

DIMENSIONS

29.00" w x 17.00" d x 37.00" h

73.66cm w x 43.18cm d x 93.98cm h

An English William IV period mahogany console table with a concealed drawer circa 1835. The design of this superb mahogany console table features a bold profile and the original design indicates its prominent placement in an interior where it would be seen from all directions because it is finished with the same attention to detail on both sides as well as the front. The entire console is constructed of fully matched mahogany timber in order to present an appealingly complete surface across the top, sides and lower shelf as well as the sculptural presence necessitated by the fully turned columns in the front with their extraordinary capitals. A marvelously quirky aspect of this console table is the back edge of the top. Please use the zoom feature offered on our website to see the slight curve of the back edge. This unusual aspect of the console means it was a special commission for a particular location in an important city home. As more and more people achieved greater wealth they would often keep a house in the city for use during the social season as well as their home in the country. These city homes tended to be multi-story homes with grand staircases and several entries where a console table was used. The curve of the staircase wall was often curved and well made furniture would also incorporate a slight curve to accommodate this architectural feature. The curve of this edge is extremely slight and without pointing it out is actually not noticeable so it does not affect the placement of the console against a flat wall. The top of the console showcases a single piece of mahogany with the extravagant grain pattern that makes mahogany such a desirable timber. This pattern would have been quite potent in the candlelight and gaslight illumination of a nineteenth century interior and easily recognized as an important attribute. The apron beneath the top is another important component that distinguishes this table as being slightly later than the Regency period (1810-1830). The outward bowing edge is visible across the front as well as the sides to create a convex surface that adds a totally different aspect to the overall appearance of the console. This section is also notable as it contains a drawer that extends the full width of the table. But as there is no visible hardware on the drawer front it remains totally concealed to an observer. The drawer is easily opened by pulling forward on the underside of the drawer and pushing it back to close. Again, please enlarge the additional photograph to see the drawer in its open position. Furniture created during the Regency period possesses a distinctively architectural sensibility and this console table contains the same design impetus seen a decade earlier. The two front columns that support the table each have an elegant tapered profile with ring turnings at both the top and base and these turnings give a sense of finish and balance to the columns. But it is the lush symmetry and balance of the Ionic capitals to the columns that give this console its desirable luxurious quality. When seen directly from the front the side to side movement of the capital's carved details is embodied in the continuous line that terminates in a bold scroll on the left and right with deep ridges when seen from the sides. Beneath the capitals on the columns is a circular ring of flared lotus blossoms that resemble those seen on the columns at Karnak in Egypt. The combination of all of these subtle details to ancient worlds was directed at an educated class who would have understood these allusions with ease. The back legs are in the form of pilasters (flattened columns) that are also decorated with carved detail. Please notice how the flat expanses feature a recessed rectangular panel outlined with a bead of quarter round moulding with a rounded oval separated by a double ring pattern. The use of highly figured timber allied with richly carved details was chosen to take advantage of progress in lighting an interior since gas lighting was widely adopted by the 1820's in private residences. This increase in interior illumination enabled furniture designers and craftsmen to vastly increase the decorative embellishments available because they could now be seen and appreciated. The entire console stands upon a plinth base that gives it a very grounded appearance similar to that seen on the base of sculptures. The plinth base became widely used beginning in the regency period through the William IV period. Plinth bases were also used during the Empire period in france and the Biedermeier period in Austria and Germany. The estimable scale of this console enables it to be placed in a wide variety of spaces within a home where its shallow depth and lovely height allow it to display objects and complete a space with style because of its light and modern feeling.