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Pair of Antique French Empire Bronze Doré Patinated Bronze Candlesticks France circa 1850

A pair of antique French Empire style bronze doré and patinated bronze candlesticks from the Louis Philippe period in France circa 1850. This handsome pair of candlesticks reflects the interest in neoclassicism that began at the end of the eighteenth century and extended through the reign of Napoleon in the Empire period at the beginning of the nineteenth century. The square plinth base on each candlestick is a direct reference to the architectural standards seen in the ruins of ancient Greece and Rome whose rediscovery through the excavations at Pompeii and Herculaneum during the eighteenth century swept through Europe and England with direct effect upon architecture and interior design. As each square plinth base ascends the squares become smaller until a large panel appears on each of the four sides bearing a raised laurel wreath secured by a fluttering ribbon. An intriguing question without an answer is that one candlestick has the ribbon at the top of each wreath while the other candlestick has the ribbon supporting the base of each wreath. This slight alteration in placement adds to the allure of these candlesticks. Both candlesticks feature a central ribbed column made of patinated bronze that rises straight from the base to the top where they each support a very decorative Corinthian capital. The even placement of the ribs around the entire circumference of the columns is the same as seen in those columns made of marble in Italy and the change in material adds terrific visual impact to the overall appearance of the candlesticks. The flared shape of the candle nozzle that mimics the capital of a marble column is also in bronze dore as is the base and this reflective sheen gives the candlesticks an impressive air of luxury. The use of gilding reached its height during the eighteenth century amongst all the aristocracies of the western world for the simple reason that gold was expensive and it never tarnished but retained its glittering effect wherever it was used. These candlesticks retain their impressive stature while their graphic neoclassical shape blend seamlessly in a twenty-first century interior.  

# FA39

DIMENSIONS

3.75" w x 3.75" d x 9.25" h

9.53cm w x 9.53cm d x 23.50cm h

$2,484.00

A pair of antique French Empire style bronze doré and patinated bronze candlesticks from the Louis Philippe period circa 1850. This handsome pair of candlesticks reflects the interest in neoclassicism that began at the end of the eighteenth century and extended through the reign of Napoleon in the Empire period at the beginning of the nineteenth century. The square plinth base on each candlestick is a direct reference to the architectural standards seen in the ruins of ancient Greece and Rome whose rediscovery through the excavations at Pompeii and Herculaneum during the eighteenth century swept through Europe and England with direct effect upon architecture and interior design. As each square plinth base ascends the squares become smaller until a large panel appears on each of the four sides bearing a raised laurel wreath secured by a fluttering ribbon. An intriguing question without an answer is that one candlestick has the ribbon at the top of each wreath while the other candlestick has the ribbon supporting the base of each wreath. This slight alteration in placement adds to the allure of these candlesticks. Both candlesticks feature a central ribbed column made of patinated bronze that rises straight from the base to the top where they each support a very decorative Corinthian capital. The even placement of the ribs around the entire circumference of the columns is the same as seen in those columns made of marble in Italy and the change in material adds terrific visual impact to the overall appearance of the candlesticks. The flared shape of the candle nozzle that mimics the capital of a marble column is also in bronze dore as is the base and this reflective sheen gives the candlesticks an impressive air of luxury. The use of gilding reached its height during the eighteenth century amongst all the aristocracies of the western world for the simple reason that gold was expensive and it never tarnished but retained its glittering effect wherever it was used. These candlesticks retain their impressive stature while their graphic neoclassical shape blend seamlessly in a twenty-first century interior.