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Antique French Régence Period Oak Buffet Credenza France circa 1730

A tall Régence period pale oak antique French buffet credenza with four drawers circa 1730. The unusual height of this cabinet and the shallow depth contribute to its dramatic impact in an interior. Please notice the symmetrical placement of all the elements that comprise the facade as well as the balance of the carved details that embellish the front of each cabinet as well as the front of each of the drawers. The configuration of the cabinet has a tall cabinet door on both the left and the right hand side that flank a centre bank of four drawers placed one atop the other. Both cabinet doors have a pair of recessed panels centred on a pattern of carving that shows a simple scroll with curved ends that meet in the centre of the top and bottom. Then panels are framed on all sides by the same scale of oak timber whose hand placed pegs are clearly visible in the photographs provided. The use of wooden pegs to join individual pieces of timber together is a time tested construction method as the wood into wood technique expands and contracts at the same rate as the weathewr changes ensuring a tight seal that lasts for centuries. All furniture constructed during the eighteenth century used this method and this is why we are able to still enjoy these pieces today as they began life securely built and have continued to enjoy the fruits of this original cabinet making skill. The front of each of the four drawer fronts are also adorned with a similar pattern of carving as the cabnet doors but here the design is placed horizontally instead of the vertical placement seen on the cabinet doors. The carved pattern on the drawers is centred on the bronze pulls that allow for easy access to each interior storage space. Both cabinet doors open with a key that fits through the bronze escutcheon to reach the interior lock and this metal plate serves not only to protect the wood from the iron key ut also gives areflective gleam in low light so the lock plate is easy to identify. Please use the zoom feature on our website to see the subtle carved detail that enhances both of the front corners of the cabinet. There is a lovely curve to the edge along with the same scrolled detail seen on the cabinet doors and drawers. The repetition of detail is a great decorative device and joins the overall design into a unified whole. The moulded edge of both the top edge and the lower apron relate spatially to each other and are slightly wider than the body of the cabinet which creates a pleasing sense of balance. The front feet are turned wood flattened spheres that support the cabinet with their curved profile. Because this cabinetbwas always meant to be seen from the front first the sides and back legs are relatively simple. What also gives this antique cabinet a modern zest is the amazing colour of the pale oak. The waxed patina provides a depth of finish that is excellent when combined with a contemporary interior while the wonderful functionality of the cabinet is as useful today as when it was forst built almost three centuries ago.

# DN107

DIMENSIONS

57.00" w x 17.00" d x 48.00" h

144.78cm w x 43.18cm d x 121.92cm h

A tall Régence period pale oak antique French buffet with four drawers circa 1730. The unusual height of this cabinet and the shallow depth contribute to its dramatic impact in an interior. Please notice the symmetrical placement of all the elements that comprise the facade as well as the balance of the carved details that embellish the front of each cabinet as well as the front of each of the drawers. The configuration of the cabinet has a tall cabinet door on both the left and the right hand side that flank a centre bank of four drawers placed one atop the other. Both cabinet doors have a pair of recessed panels centred on a pattern of carving that shows a simple scroll with curved ends that meet in the centre of the top and bottom. Then panels are framed on all sides by the same scale of oak timber whose hand placed pegs are clearly visible in the photographs provided. The use of wooden pegs to join individual pieces of timber together is a time tested construction method as the wood into wood technique expands and contracts at the same rate as the weathewr changes ensuring a tight seal that lasts for centuries. All furniture constructed during the eighteenth century used this method and this is why we are able to still enjoy these pieces today as they began life securely built and have continued to enjoy the fruits of this original cabinet making skill. The front of each of the four drawer fronts are also adorned with a similar pattern of carving as the cabnet doors but here the design is placed horizontally instead of the vertical placement seen on the cabinet doors. The carved pattern on the drawers is centred on the bronze pulls that allow for easy access to each interior storage space. Both cabinet doors open with a key that fits through the bronze escutcheon to reach the interior lock and this metal plate serves not only to protect the wood from the iron key ut also gives areflective gleam in low light so the lock plate is easy to identify. Please use the zoom feature on our website to see the subtle carved detail that enhances both of the front corners of the cabinet. There is a lovely curve to the edge along with the same scrolled detail seen on the cabinet doors and drawers. The repetition of detail is a great decorative device and joins the overall design into a unified whole. The moulded edge of both the top edge and the lower apron relate spatially to each other and are slightly wider than the body of the cabinet which creates a pleasing sense of balance. The front feet are turned wood flattened spheres that support the cabinet with their curved profile. Because this cabinetbwas always meant to be seen from the front first the sides and back legs are relatively simple. What also gives this antique cabinet a modern zest is the amazing colour of the pale oak. The waxed patina provides a depth of finish that is excellent when combined with a contemporary interior while the wonderful functionality of the cabinet is as useful today as when it was forst built almost three centuries ago.