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Antique English Regency Style Mahogany Bench Edwardian Period England circa 1910

An antique English Regency style mahogany bench from the Edwardian period in England circa 1910. Please notice the amazingly contemporary profile of this bench. The simple shape of the seat features a raised cylinder at each end elevated above the seat on pegs so they appear to float above the surface. The seat has a slight slope to its edge and extends beyond the apron and legs beneath. Each of the four legs are shaped from a solid pice of mahogany timber and have a pleasing taper from the top to the bottom. The combination of a large turned ring at the top of each leg and then a tapered shaft below creates a striking effect. The foot of each leg is actually derived from a foot invented during the reign of Louis XVI in France (1774-1792) known as a "toupie" foot because of its severely tapered cylindrical profile. The apron beneath the seat is slightly recessed between the four legs and its straight line provides an excellent counterpoint to the legs and floating cylinders above the seat. Originally these benches were used in front of windows and first appeared during the Regency period (1810-1830) as all furniture moved to a more geometric graphic silhouette. In the winter a cushion featuring needlepoint by the women of the house was placed on top for comfort and then removed in warmer weather. These benches have a particularly modern aspect to them and flow effortlessly in the design of modern spaces.

# EFH135

DIMENSIONS

23.00" w x 15.00" d x 19.00" h

58.42cm w x 38.10cm d x 48.26cm h

A Regency style mahogany bench from the Edwardian period in England c.1910. Please notice the amazingly contemporary profile of this bench. The simple shape of the seat features a raised cylinder at each end elevated above the seat on pegs so they appear to float above the surface. The seat has a slight slope to its edge and extends beyond the apron and legs beneath. Each of the four legs are shaped from a solid pice of mahogany timber and have a pleasing taper from the top to the bottom. The combination of a large turned ring at the top of each leg and then a tapered shaft below creates a striking effect. The foot of each leg is actually derived from a foot invented during the reign of Louis XVI in France (1774-1792) known as a "toupie" foot because of its severely tapered cylindrical profile. The apron beneath the seat is slightly recessed between the four legs and its straight line provides an excellent counterpoint to the legs and floating cylinders above the seat. Originally these benches were used in front of windows and first appeared during the Regency period (1810-1830) as all furniture moved to a more geometric graphic silhouette. In the winter a cushion featuring needlepoint by the women of the house was placed on top for comfort and then removed in warmer weather. These benches have a particularly modern aspect to them and flow effortlessly in the design of modern spaces.